Category Archives: Technology enhanced learning

If we build them, will they come? The stickiness of Open Badges.

So I thought Twitter was just a phase… How wrong I was. It bewilders me: what makes one social media application ‘stick’ and another one wither away into an html graveyard? This was the concern for those attending a session on The Realities of Badging at the Opening Education Practices in Scotland Advisory Forum in October. Open Badges (OBs) are digital image files created by Mozilla Firefox and are being taken up by some educationalists as a tool for recognising and rewarding non-academic activities [think boy/girl scout badges for the digital generation]. These files contain metadata about what skills, qualities, and level of achievements the badge holder has attained, as well as information about who has issued the badge, and even its verification by a third party. The value in their portability and imagery emerges when students add them to their social media sites, such as Facebook, LinkedIn, and WordPress, in order to showcase their employability

For OB’s to ‘stick’, a reciprocal affiliation needs to develop between HE and FE institutions and employers. With such few trials of OBs in existence in the UK, the qualities of this relationship are unclear. For universities, there is no point spending resources creating OBs unless employers agree to value OBs, understanding what they represent and what weighting they carry. Employers are reluctant to offer their unreserved support for OBs until they understand the purpose and currency of OBs through regular adoption and use by HE and FE institutions. A charity director at the session summed up this catch-22 situation with her somewhat rhetorical question, ‘if we build them, will they come?’.

In her blog post Evidencing Employability Skills with Open Badges, Grainne Hamilton, a former Jisc RSC Scotland employee, summed up three possible barriers to making OB’s ‘stick’ for employers:

  1. Employers want to immediately understand the value behind a badge. They don’t want to spend time clicking through to the detail of a badge unless they feel it will reveal something worthwhile

  2. Employers are concerned with badge apathy and are likely to be put off the concept of badges if they come across too many badges that are irrelevant to them in a given context

  3. It is probable that new trust networks will develop but initially it is likely badges from issuers employers already know and trust will be valued more.

Grainne’s blog post offers some solutions to these problems, including tagging, clustering and endorsing badges. However, for me, there is a larger issue that needs to be addressed around employability and the use of Open Badges: one of articulation. Wouldn’t handing out badges, albeit in shiny digital formats, simply reinforce the cognitive acquisition metaphor of ‘skills’ that can be ‘transferred’ from one place to another? As my colleagues in the Careers department argued when asked about OBs, the issue isn’t how we represent the skills attained – a certificate, digital badges or LinkedIn – it is how the student then articulates their understanding of this skill in relation to the workplace during an interview. The issue isn’t about how easily the employer can understand or recognise the significance of a LinkedIn endorsement or an Open Badge for Digital Learning, it is about how the student recognises and translates their non-academic experiences into professional responses about workplace practice. As educators, this is where our focus needs to be directed in order to better understand and enhance graduate employability.

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